Scottish NHS Achieves First in Early Warning and Response for Sickest Patients

PatientrackFrontline clinicians in Fife have achieved a major impact on patient safety, following Scotland’s first ever go live of a comprehensive electronic clinical observation and early warning system. NHS Fife became the first health board in Scotland to deploy a full scale electronic track and trigger system, after going live with Patientrack at Victoria Hospital. For the first time the technology has given healthcare professionals real-time visibility of the sickest patients on individual wards across the hospital, and has allowed a rapid improvement in the way staff monitor vital signs and respond to deteriorating patients.

Cardiac arrests have fallen by as much as two thirds in one of the busiest hospital areas after only six months of using the technology. Doctors expect that the technology will impact in other ways and that it offers significant potential for hospitals throughout Scotland.

Dr Gavin Simpson, consultant critical care and anaesthetics at NHS Fife, who led the clinical deployment of Patientrack at NHS Fife, said: "Any clinician can now instantly see the profiles of the sickest patients in the hospital. Patientrack has helped us introduce some of the biggest and most immediate changes in clinical practice I have ever seen.

"There are warning signs before cardiac arrests. The key is to pick them up quickly, that is what Patientrack allows. Patientrack has helped us achieve an immediate and significant reduction in cardiac arrests in one of the busiest areas of the hospital, by up to two thirds.

"Moving forward, Patientrack has the potential to address a range of clinical problems faced by hospitals across Scotland."

The technology works by ensuring that crucial observations are not missed and allows nurses to capture vital signs digitally at the bedside. Patientrack then accurately calculates the patient’s early warning score and automatically calls doctors to intervene when signs of deterioration are present. The system continues to escalate calls until patients receive an appropriate response. This has already meant that nurses using the system at Victoria Hospital in Fife no longer need to manually phone for doctors to attend, and can more effectively prioritise patients on the ward.

Marie Paterson, senior charge nurse on the Cardiac Care Unit and Cardiology Ward, NHS Fife said: "Patientrack is a really useful tool and assists us to keep patients safe. It helps the nurse in charge to see where the deteriorating patients are being nursed, which is really helpful when organising teams. It allows the nurse in charge to check that these patients are receiving the appropriate care and to give advice and support to junior colleagues who may be caring for these patients."

The technology has also had an impact on NHS Fife's safety huddles, where clinical teams meet daily to review clinical and operational safety issues and are made more effective by the use of Patientrack.

Dr Rob Cargill, associate medical director, NHS Fife said: "We are the only hospital in Scotland with the ability to identify in real-time all of our sickest patients and have a meaningful clinical discussion about patient care. Our safety huddle prioritises clinical issues and allows a multi-professional team to discuss individual patients at risk and ensure there is a management plan in place. It is enormously powerful to be able to view a live summary of where the sickest patients in our hospital are so we can respond appropriately."

Encouraged by Scottish ministers, safety huddles are designed to ensure patients at risk are identified and managed collaboratively. In NHS Fife, live data, shown through the Patientrack system during the safety huddle meeting, ensures that every area of the hospital is aware of priority patients and that wards are properly equipped to care for them.

Val Hatch, divisional general manager for emergency services in NHS Fife, said: "Our safety huddle has developed over time to have less discussion around bed management to become a conversation about supporting appropriate clinical decisions. This has been enabled by having real-time information on the whereabouts and status of every patient across the hospital and encourages high levels of clinical engagement."

Healthcare professionals now believe the technology has significant potential for other hospitals in Scotland, with the technology supporting the objectives of the Scottish Patient Safety Programme to reduce hospital mortality, to better identify deteriorating patients, to reduce cardiac arrests, and to target serious conditions like sepsis. The track and trigger system also offers Scotland's hospitals an opportunity to meet the ambitions of Scotland’s Healthcare Quality Strategy by reducing avoidable harm as well as progressing the 2020 vision of Scotland's eHealth strategy to electronically record and share findings in order to quickly and easily initiate care processes.

William Edwards, general manager for eHealth and IM&T at NHS Fife, said: "This is a prime example of eHealth at its best: clinical teams collaborating with technology specialists to deliver better, safer care for patients. Healthcare professionals in Fife have taken the lead and worked in partnership with IT teams to respond to real clinical priorities and make technology work for the good of the patients we serve."

Dr Grant Forrest, eHealth clinical lead, NHS Fife said: "It is great to see a project where eHealth has made a significant difference to frontline care, helping staff to swiftly communicate crucial information needed to keep patients safe. IT can bring the most value when clinicians and technology specialists get together to understand and address real challenges."

Donald Kennedy, managing director of Patientrack, said: "NHS Fife has become a Scottish pioneer in using its information to quickly understand where it’s most unwell patients are, so that it can immediately prioritise resources and alert clinicians to intervene. This is a fantastic move for better, safer care in Scotland and we look forward to spreading the benefits across the country."

About Patientrack
Patientrack helps hospitals deliver safer care - which is also more cost-effective care - by ensuring observation and assessment protocols are carried out correctly and consistently, and by automatically calculating early warning scores and alerting clinicians when interventions are needed. Through early identification of deteriorating patients, and the promoting of necessary assessments, Patientrack helps hospitals meet national and local targets for improvements in patient safety, improving patient outcomes and supporting frontline staff, while at the same time cutting costs and reducing paper. Patientrack was developed in conjunction with health professionals and its effectiveness in delivering both patient safety and cost improvements has been proven in a peer-reviewed clinical journal.

Most Popular Now

SAP IoT Startup Accelerator

The SAP IoT Startup Accelerator is a structured co-innovation program for selected B2B startups focusing on the Internet of Things. The Accelerator helps startups grow and scale their businesses alongside...

Read more

Paving the Way for eHealth Interoperabil…

The EURO-CAS project launched operations today to deliver the eHealth Conformity Assessment Scheme for Europe in 2018. This scheme will help European health systems assess the conformity of eHealth products...

Read more

SkinVision Unveils Breakthrough Algorith…

Dutch mobile health startup SkinVision has revealed its new algorithm that can detect most common forms of deadly skin cancer. Previously focused on detecting melanoma skin cancer, the app can...

Read more

eHealth Hub Solution Match Call: Hospita…

Solution Match is one of the services offered by the EU-funded initiative eHealth Hub, intending to promote and boost up commercialization. The eHealth Hub aims to provide long-term support to...

Read more

Wearable AI System can Detect a Conversa…

It's a fact of nature that a single conversation can be interpreted in very different ways. For people with anxiety or conditions such as Asperger's, this can make social situations...

Read more

Biovision World Life Science Forum 2017

4 - 6 April 2017, Lyon, France. Biovision World Life Science Forum is fostering a unique approach to meet, connect and collaborate between international decision-makers from the academic, civil society, policy-making...

Read more

Doctrina Raises €1,020,000 of New Capita…

Doctrina, a start-up company transforming the traditional transfer of knowledge between pharmaceutical companies and pharmacies, has raised a total of €1,020,000 in series A funding. The investment will enable Doctrina...

Read more

DIY Live Cell Imaging Using a Smartphone

A recent study from Uppsala University shows how smartphones can be used to make movies of living cells, without the need for expensive equipment. The study is published in the...

Read more

Horder Healthcare Uses IMS MAXIMS Electr…

Healthcare provider Horder Healthcare is to deploy an electronic patient record (EPR) from software provider IMS MAXIMS, in order to improve care for thousands of patients and facilitate its digital...

Read more

Brain-Computer Interface Allows Complete…

A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with complete locked-in syndrome according to a new...

Read more

Pitch Your Digital Health Solution at th…

The second eHealth Roadshow, promoted by the new EU-funded eHealth Hub project, will take place on the 6th of April in Stuttgart, Germany, in the frame of the Medtec Europe...

Read more

Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit

28 - 01 March 2017, London, UK. Discover advances in deep learning tools and techniques from the world's leading innovators across industry, academia and the healthcare sector. Learn from the experts...

Read more
(HEALTH IT) SPACE - Take a look at who has just Joined