Artificial Intelligence Advances Threaten Privacy of Health Data

Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, study shows. Led by UC Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal.

The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data.

The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.

"We wanted to use NHANES (the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) to look at privacy questions because this data is representative of the diverse population in the U.S.," said Aswani. "The results point out a major problem. If you strip all the identifying information, it doesn't protect you as much as you'd think. Someone else can come back and put it all back together if they have the right kind of information."

"In principle, you could imagine Facebook gathering step data from the app on your smartphone, then buying health care data from another company and matching the two," he added. "Now they would have health care data that's matched to names, and they could either start selling advertising based on that or they could sell the data to others."

According to Aswani, the problem isn't with the devices, but with how the information the devices capture can be misused and potentially sold on the open market.

"I'm not saying we should abandon these devices," he said. "But we need to be very careful about how we are using this data. We need to protect the information. If we can do that, it's a net positive."

Though the study specifically looked at step data, the results suggest a broader threat to the privacy of health data.

"HIPAA regulations make your health care private, but they don't cover as much as you think," Aswani said. "Many groups, like tech companies, are not covered by HIPAA, and only very specific pieces of information are not allowed to be shared by current HIPAA rules. There are companies buying health data. It's supposed to be anonymous data, but their whole business model is to find a way to attach names to this data and sell it."

Aswani said advances in AI make it easier for companies to gain access to health data, the temptation for companies to use it in illegal or unethical ways will increase. Employers, mortgage lenders, credit card companies and others could potentially use AI to discriminate based on pregnancy or disability status, for instance.

"Ideally, what I'd like to see from this are new regulations or rules that protect health data," he said. "But there is actually a big push to even weaken the regulations right now. For instance, the rule-making group for HIPAA has requested comments on increasing data sharing. The risk is that if people are not aware of what's happening, the rules we have will be weakened. And the fact is the risks of us losing control of our privacy when it comes to health care are actually increasing and not decreasing."

Liangyuan Na, Cong Yang, Chi-Cheng Lo, Fangyuan Zhao, Yoshimi Fukuoka, Anil Aswani.
Feasibility of Reidentifying Individuals in Large National Physical Activity Data Sets From Which Protected Health Information Has Been Removed With Use of Machine Learning.
JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1(8):e186040. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.6040

Most Popular Now

A New Machine Learning Model can Classif…

Machine learning has improved dramatically in recent years and shown great promise in the field of medical image analysis. A team of research specialists at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center...

Could Blockchain Ensure Integrity of Cli…

UC San Francisco researchers have created a proof-of-concept method for ensuring the integrity of clinical trials data with blockchain. The system creates an immutable audit trail that makes it easy...

3D Child Welfare: How Data, Design and D…

Opinion Article by Rainer Binder, Managing Director, Global Employment and Social Services, Accenture Child welfare remains a pressing challenge for governments around the world, and the statistics are heart-breaking. In the...

Bringing more Human Intelligence to AI, …

The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the...

Scotland's Digital Health Leaders Recogn…

Scotland's digital health champions have been recognised for their achievements at the Holyrood Connect Digital Health and Care Awards 2019. William Edwards, director of eHealth at NHS Greater Glasgow and...

DMEA 2019: International Exchange on Dig…

9 - 11 April 2019, Berlin, Germany. DMEA (formerly conhIT) is the industry's main event for digital healthcare. In that context, an international exchange of experiences and networking beyond national borders...

Philips to Expand its Radiology Informat…

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire the Healthcare Information Systems business of Carestream Health...

Three Winners of 2019 Sandoz Healthcare …

Sandoz, a Novartis division, announced the winners of the 2019 Sandoz Healthcare Access Challenge (HACk). Sandoz HACk invites entrepreneurs and innovators in the field of digital technology to submit ideas...

UK Sales of Xanax and other Prescription…

Sales of prescription psychiatric drugs such as Xanax and diazepam via darknet online drug markets have increased in the UK at an alarming rate, according to new research by the...

Accenture Wins GLOMO Award for Virtual R…

The Accenture (NYSE: ACN) Virtual Experience Solutions (AVEnueS) has won "Best Mobile VR or AR" at the GSMA GLOMO Awards 2019. The award was presented at MWC19 Barcelona.

Study Finds Robots can Detect Breast Can…

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and despite important improvements in therapy, it is still a major cause for cancer-related mortality, accounting for approximately 500,000 annual deaths...